Right now, Linux has some great programming libraries for developing games, but when it comes to working as a level designer or an artist, the tools are lagging behind Windows and Mac OS X. It’s not from lack of trying. There are great developers working on tools day and night for Linux, but the going is slow. Unity announced an export option for their engine so that game developers on Mac and Windows can export to Linux. This is EXCELLENT news for Linux game players. It’s the same news as always for Linux game developers: to make games: buy a Mac or pay for Windows if you want to make games.

We started this campaign to change that message. We want Linux to be a first-class citizen for game developers. We recently open sourced Torque 3D under the MIT license, and the first deluge of questions were about Linux compatibility. The move to open source Torque was something that the founders of GarageGames wanted to do over 10 years ago, but they also needed a business model for their studio.


cheetah[1]
Torque is the engine that was originally used in the firs Tribes games, and has seen a number of advancements throughout its history. Since open sourcing it, we have had nearly 300 forks of the codebase on GitHub. You can find out more information about Torque at the GarageGames site and download it from GitHub to kick the tires. Unfortunately, it’s only for Windows right now, so you might have to flex your Wine or dual-booting muscles to try it out.

 

source
  • http://www.indiegogo.com/torque3d-for-linux

3 COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY